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There’s no doubt about it. Cheese is one of the most pleasurable foods to eat after a little cannabis. Whether it’s used a gooey topping for pizza, slathered over nachos, baked into a lasagna, or simply eaten as a snack, cheese turns the drabbest of foods into mouthwatering sustenance. But, is it healthy? New evidence suggests that it may be better for you than first thought.

Danish researchers suggest cheese is good for you

If Quitting Cheese 1 If Quitting Cheese Is Your New Years Resolution, Think Again
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Planning on giving up the stuff this New Year? You might want to think again. Danish researchers wanted to put cheese to the test. Does consuming dairy or cheese cause measurable changes to metabolism?

To look into the matter, the scientists put 15 healthy young men on three different diets for two weeks. Two of the groups received dairy, in the form of milk or cheese. The third group remained as a control.

The researchers found that those who ate cheese saw a decrease in a compound called TMAO. TMAO is a metabolite present after eating meat products. Meat contains a vital b-vitamin called choline, which is broken down by the liver. TMAO is released as a break-down product.

Some studies have found that TMAO is associated with heart disease. Others have suggested that meat-heavy diets promote gut microbes that can better convert certain compounds in meat into TMAO, which changes the way the body handles cholesterol and increases risks of cardiovascular events.

Yet, it’s important to note that these claims are controversial and have received quite a bit of criticism from nutrition experts.

According to the recent Danish study, cheese seems to contradict this process, reducing TMAO. The researchers also found that eating cheese altered the microbial environment in the gut.

Those who ate cheese had increased levels of compounds called short-chain fatty acids in their urine when compared to controls. Short-chain fatty acids are created by gut microbes as they digest and metabolize foods.

Dairy produced a similar effect, though cheese produced the strongest response.

More research needed

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Unfortunately, research in the area of nutrition is almost as controversial and confusing as cannabis research. It simply isn’t practical to run studies on big nutrition questions. Scientific studies are tightly controlled, and often look at only one variable at a time or rely on observational studies or self-reporting.

This means that whenever a nutrition study is published, researchers can only look at one tiny part of the equation at any given time, or they must rely on unreliable reports or observations.

The Danish cheese study is small and short-lived. Study participants only maintained the diet for two weeks, the long-term effects of continuous dairy consumption were not reported. The research for the study was funded by the Danish Dairy Research Foundation and Arla Foods (a food company that produces dairy products).

Regardless of these concerns, the results of the Danish study are certainly interesting. Those who have decided to lay off the stuff may want to reconsider, as a little bit of the delicious treasure might do some good, especially for those who eat a lot of meat products. However, more research is needed to be sure.

Try these 3 delicious cheese recipes

1. Cannabis Queso Dip

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This cannabis-infused queso dip is ready to join the party.

2. Easy Macaroni and Cheese

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This easy macaroni and cheese recipe is good go-to when you’re feeling a little under the weather. This recipe calls for cheddar, but it’s also tasty with other cheese.

3. Grilled Cheese Sandwiches

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We like this all-American classic with a combination of cheddar and gruyère cheese.

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