SHARE

Since Uruguay’s decision in December 2013 to fully decriminalize and legalize marijuana, other countries have slowly been following suit. Many of these countries have already partially decriminalized or legalized marijuana, but have yet to take the plunge to full legalization; Leafly tells us which countries are likely to be next.

 10 Countries Most Likely to Fully Legalize Weed

10 Countries Most Likely to Fully legalize Weed

By The Stoner's Cookbook

In December, 2013 Uruguay became the 1st country to fully legalize recreational cannabis countrywide. Since then, the rest of the world has been testing the waters with Who's next? Leafly weighs in. 

  • Jamaica

    By The Stoner's Cookbook

    Bob Marley. Do we really need to say more? [H](http://http//www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2014/06/08/jamaica-marijuana-ganja/9992405/)[ere's](http://http//www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2014/06/08/jamaica-marijuana-ganja/9992405/) an article if you're not convinced.

  • Spain

    By The Stoner's Cookbook

    Spain has a cannabis advantage already – while technically illegal, cannabis remains legal to possess and consume in a private setting, making Spain a logical choice to transition.

  • Czech Republic

    By The Stoner's Cookbook

    Medical cannabis has been decriminalized in the Czech Republic & is available for sale with a prescription. Recreational use of cannabis is so commonplace that it has become a canna-tourism hot spot.

  • Colombia

    By The Stoner's Cookbook

    The War on Drugs has raged for 40 years & no country has had it worse than Colombia. President Santos has admitted that [the War on Drugs is a failure](http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304279904579516302547337862) & he’s seeking new options, possibly legalization.

  • Costa Rica

    By The Stoner's Cookbook

    Costa Rica has decriminalized the use and possession of cannabis (but [cultivation is prohibited](http://news.co.cr/can-you-legally-grow-marijuana-in-costa-rica/31167/)), and they treat illegal drugs as a public health matter rather than a crime.

  • Portugal

    By The Stoner's Cookbook

    Portugal [decriminalized all drugs in 2001](http://content.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1893946,00.html) & has been treating drug addiction as a public health concern rather than a criminal matter. Since then, Portugal has seen a [50% drop in drug addiction](http://www.forbes.com/sites/erikkain/2011/07/05/ten-years-after-decriminalization-drug-abuse-down-by-half-in-portugal/).

  • Peru

    By The Stoner's Cookbook

    Consumption & [personal possession of up to 8 grams](http://rt.com/news/peru-calls-marijuana-legalization-165/) is legal, but sale & production remains illegal. However, after the recent ruling for legalization in Uruguay, Peru may be following suit.

  • Switzerland

    By The Stoner's Cookbook

    Small amounts of cannabis have been [decriminalized](http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/switzerland-changes-law-to-decriminalise-marijuana-possession-8856308.html), but there are no plans for legalization. The neutral attitudes & lack of problems related to cannabis make the climate ideal for legalization.

  • Mexico

    By The Stoner's Cookbook

    In the wake of drug cartels and the failure of the [War on Drugs](http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/02/world/americas/mexico-drug-war-fast-facts/), two bills, one for decriminalization and one for medical use, have been proposed. If passed, they could lead to remarkable change.

  • Canada

    By The Stoner's Cookbook

    Canada has long embraced [medical marijuana](http://www.leafly.com/knowledge-center/canada/the-mmpr-and-you) & recently passed a [production & distribution law](http://www.marketwatch.com/story/canadas-new-marijuana-laws-set-stage-for-growth-2014-04-17) to support [licensed marijuana producers](https://www.tilray.ca/). Recreational use is illegal but policing is largely unenforced.

SHARE