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Seibo Shen, friend and founder of VapeXhale, has already regaled us with his methods for utilizing cannabis as a professional, whether that be optimizing athletic performance or gaining valuable perspective. However, we are even more excited about this installment which explores cannabis and sensory deprivation.

If you’re unfamiliar with flotation tanks, they are enclosed pools that offer a unique mental experience by minimizing your sensing. Seibo shares his personal experience in a float tank and what he discovered adding cannabis into the mix. Enjoy Part 1 of this two-part segment, and check back soon for the rest of the story!

seibo shen Floating on Cannabis: Elevating With Sensory Deprivation, Part 1

Ever since I can remember I’ve had an overactive brain and high energy levels.  I could be speaking with someone, watching TV, and running a dialogue in my mind all at the same time.  I believe my ability to multitask has really helped me run a company, but when it comes to getting sleep or quieting my mind, it feels like a redlining engine that I can’t turn off.  Although I thrive off of this energy and love what I do, I have to admit that it can be very mentally challenging and exhausting.  Over the past few years, I have begun to practice the art of meditation as a way to better control my brain, mind, and consciousness.

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Photo credit: Pixabay

I really enjoy learning new things and tend to pick up things quickly, but with meditation, the harder I tried the more frustrated I got.  Typically when I sit still, I get antsy, my butt and knees hurt from being in the lotus position, and I struggle to clear my mind.  How am I supposed to find mental clarity when I am so aware of my physical discomfort?  That’s when someone told me to try a float tank.  For those that don’t know, a flotation tank is a sensory deprivation pool that is filled with just enough salt for buoyancy and is heated to the exact same temperature as your skin so you can’t tell where your body ends and the water begins.  They also turn off all the lights and close the door so you can’t see or hear — you are deprived of almost all your senses. You are just left with your mind.

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Photo credit: Jon Rolg via Flickr

The first time I went into a float tank, I was oddly nervous.  I wouldn’t say that I’m claustrophobic but the thought of getting into an enclosed pool and sitting in complete silence and darkness gave me butterflies.  I decided to do two sessions: one would be an hour warm-up to get myself acclimated and the second would be for a full two hours.  The first hour was an interesting experience.  I tried closing my eyes and focusing on my breath so I could get into a meditative state.  Although I was void of my senses, I was still very aware of my surroundings and just trying to take in the whole experience.  After some time (I can’t say exactly how long since I wasn’t aware of the time) I finally began to relax and could focus on my breath again.  I could feel my brain let go — different thoughts flowed into my consciousness but nothing I really focused on.  I was getting into a state of mind where I could be totally present and not distracted with future or past thoughts. But suddenly I heard the door open and my session was over.

A few days later, I went back for my second session. This time I hoped to get more out of it since I was already acclimated. I decided I’d enhance this session with some cannabis which has helped me before with my meditation practice. My strain of choice was Trainwreck, which I’ve found personally optimal for introspection. As I put the flower in my trusty VapeXhale EVO, I set my intention to get the most out of my next session.  After a few vapes I went into the float tank and that’s when the magic happened.

< To be continued… >

Featured image The Plaid Zebra

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