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Two great things that are even better together is the idea behind a political party merger in Australia that might have you shaking your head. What two powers have combined to win more seats in the federal election this summer? Weed and Sex, of course.

Sex, drugs, & rock n’ roll

sexparty How Can You Not Vote For The Sex, Drugs & Rock N Roll Party?
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The Hemp Party, established in 1993, works to make cannabis legal and as socially accepted as alcohol, if not more so. Party spokesman Andrew Kavilas told The Guardian:

If marijuana were to replace alcohol as the major social tonic in society, there would be less aggression on the streets, lower road tolls, less domestic violence, better sleeping patterns, more creative work output and less vomit on the streets.

The Sex Party is a political group, not a swinger’s function, just to clarify. It was established in 2009 to advocate on behalf of the sex industry and fight against censorship. They have also expanded to pine for support of marriage equality and prison reform.

Supporting each other

australian party based on sex drugs 2 How Can You Not Vote For The Sex, Drugs & Rock N Roll Party?
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The recent change to Senate voting rules forced the parties to combine forces, and with the Labor Party having to moderate its platform to catch more center votes, the two have made for an irresistible combination that has adopted the full spectrum of issues near and dear to progressive voters. They also aren’t afraid to cause a stir, as Fiona Patten, an MP in Victoria and “high” ranking member of the Sex Party told anti-Islamic protesters at a shopping center in Coburg to:

They also aren’t afraid to cause a stir, as Fiona Patten, an MP in Victoria and “high” ranking member of the Sex Party told anti-Islamic protesters at a shopping center in Coburg to:

Take your messages of hate – and piss off!

Taking on religious tax-exemption

australian party based on sex drugs 3 How Can You Not Vote For The Sex, Drugs & Rock N Roll Party?
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The parties have an impressive cadre of politicians in their ranks, and together are pitching their tents to address a lot of issues, including the tax breaks of the church. They say that the tax-free status of organized religions, whether it be for property deals, hotels, insurance companies, poker machine companies, and even alcohol companies like wineries amounts to “advancing religion”.

The issue of taxing churches is a high-profile one that apparently has the support of almost 64% of the population, and gives the combined party significant clout with the voters. Robin Bristow, the lead Senate candidate for Queensland, says that the church has an unfair seat of authority in influencing political issues ranging from marriage equality and abortion laws to cannabis legalization, and can get away with it because their tax status allows them more finances to lobby.

On all these issues the church is interfering with our secular lives and basically telling us what we should do. – Bristow

Patten says that the groups receive far wider support than you might expect and that even octogenarians have come up to her and said they are voting for the Sex Party.

Do you think the parties will have mass appeal, despite their controversial roots? Will they continue to push the envelope, and the conversation in Australia? Is the merger going to help their causes or harm them? Share your thoughts on social media or in the comments below.

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