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One of the most important issues facing the legalization of medical cannabis is a doctor’s ability to control an exact dosage. For years, physicians and researchers have used different methods to pinpoint the necessary amount for patients and ensure they are not abusing the medication. After years of testing, a medical company has finally perfected dosing by using a cannabis inhaler that can be 3D printed and controlled remotely by doctors and prescribes, taking all the guess work out of prescribing medical cannabis.

Medical breakthrough

A New 3D 1 3D Printed Cannabis Inhaler Lets Doctors Administer Medicine Remotely
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Israel is home to more than 26,000 medical cannabis users. Prescribed for a variety of ailments ranging from pain management to cancer, cannabis has been recognized as an important medical resource for many years.

Throughout its time in use, doctors have often worried about controlling doses and ensuring patients are receiving the correct amount of cannabis each day.

Syqe Medical, a medical start-up company based in Tel Aviv, recently introduced a cannabis inhaler that would allow prescribers to remotely control and monitor the dosage used by patients.

Unlike any other medical device on the market, this new inhaler has the power to change the way many nations worldwide look at and handle medical cannabis.

Eytan Hyam, Syqe Medical chairman, knows the company’s new invention will help to facilitate the prescribing of medical cannabis in those places where many doctors may have otherwise shied away from the idea.

For doctors, the inhaler solves the problem of prescribing plants for smoking, and offers a solution for patients in that, for the first time, they will be able to receive a precise dose of medical cannabis.

Inner workings of the cannabis inhaler

A New 3D 2 3D Printed Cannabis Inhaler Lets Doctors Administer Medicine Remotely
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The cannabis inhalers are printed using a special medical-grade 3D printer. Not only does this help to keep their cost low, the design and implementation offer extra layers of discretion, for those patients who might not want others to know they are using medical cannabis.

Two versions of the inhaler are currently in production, one for individuals and one for hospital use. The hospital grade version also includes an easy-to-use interface that allows medical providers to control and distribute doses as necessary.

Intensive care units, pain management clinics, cancer treatment centers and many other medical facilities stand to benefit from this new controlled form of cannabis.

Cartridges containing 100 micrograms of cannabis come preloaded, made especially for the inhaler. Users and prescribers are able to monitor and control the thermal and air flow, study a lung interface in real time and wirelessly connect to a clinic’s database to save data for future research.

Rather than using strong, chemically-altered cannabis concentrates, the preloaded cartridges contain unmodified cannabis, making it safer and easier to control.

By being able to control the exact dosage, the inhaler will provide invaluable information about cannabis as a medical treatment and how much is actually necessary to see results.

The number of Israel’s medical cannabis licenses are expected to double by 2018. This new inhaler is likely to boost those numbers even higher, now that more patients will be able to know with certainty their medication is being controlled and monitors closely by healthcare providers.

A new deal with Teva Pharmaceuticals could have Syqe’s inhaler distributed nationwide within the year.

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