SHARE

Love for cannabis is at an all-time high, and only moving higher. More than half the nation takes part in the legal cannabis market. But as access spreads, the way many people choose to buy cannabis is expected to change. Here are the Four S’s of the new cannabis market.

 Size

The Way People 1 4 Reasons Why You Will Buy Cannabis Differently In The Future
Photo credit

With California, the sixth largest economy on the planet entering recreational sales, the US market just doubled. Next door, Canada is also gearing up to allow recreational use, increasing the market further. A bigger market means more producers, more supply, more competition, and thus lower prices.

The consumer market size also plays into this shift. For every one severe medical patient, there are scores of healthy users per capita.

Selection

The Way People 2 4 Reasons Why You Will Buy Cannabis Differently In The Future
Photo credit

Only a few years ago, the visit to a rec. vs. med dispensary would be night and day. But low THC strains and profile-specific products are making waves in recreational markets, and have spawned the “mildly-psychoactive” mainstream market.

In the next few years, recreational products will mirror the quality and selection of medical ones, just to cater to customers.

State elections

The Way People 3 4 Reasons Why You Will Buy Cannabis Differently In The Future
Photo credit

Now that the dust has begun to settle from the Presidential election, and programs begin to ramp up in newly legal states, politicians need to align with the green.

Their elections come up in 2018, and with the temperature of voters today, if they don’t support pro-cannabis legislation, they face replacement.

This translates into the perfect storm for pro-cannabis legislation next year, including banking or tax deduction, which could reduce cannabis costs even further.

Sales taxes

The Way People 4 4 Reasons Why You Will Buy Cannabis Differently In The Future
Photo credit

Most people know the sticker shock of grabbing a quick container of milk from the corner store. The price is higher, but the trip was quicker. Count the time and gasoline saved, and a few dollars seems a small price to pay. Cannabis access will inevitably go this route.

The taxes on recreational cannabis remain a large factor in patient choices. With medicine quality comparable and the number of rec. dispensaries already outpacing med., making locations closer on average, savings are the last bastion of the medical business.

But with the other factors reducing the cost of recreational weed products, these may cancel out. In addition, California plans to only charge rec. taxes to non-medical patients. Recreational convenience at medical pricing? Who wouldn’t make that choice?

SHARE