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So, when it comes to the ideal dunk time for an Oreo cookie, just what is the right amount of time? Whether it’s a long dunk that almost sees the cookie fall apart or the quick kind of dunk that barely stays in the milk, the technique changes from person to person. Then, in 2016, someone decided that a study needed to take place to find just what the ideal dunk time is. It took place at Utah State University’s Splash Lab, where the lucky boffins put in the hard yards – and the cookies in the milk – to find the answer to the age-old question.

The dunk time saturation point

The Optimal Oreo 1 Relax Guys, The Optimal Oreo Dunk Time Has Been Uncovered By Science
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What was the result of all that dunking and snacking? Success, that’s what, since the saturation point for most cookies was uncovered.

When it comes to Oreos, in the first second, the cookie soaks up 50 percent of the total amount of milk it’s able to absorb. A second after that, the Oreo has almost taken on almost all of the milk that’s possible, with it being at 80 percent capacity.

The next second sees the remaining 20 percent of saturation, well, saturated. By four seconds, the cookie has reached full saturation. So, if you’re after the maximum amount of milky saturation of an Oreo cookie, that’s the amount of time you’ll need to dunk.

That’s it, though, as any longer is just unneeded (and delaying the cookie making its way into your mouth).

The white stuff

The Optimal Oreo 2 Relax Guys, The Optimal Oreo Dunk Time Has Been Uncovered By Science
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No, not the filling, but the milk. It’s worth mentioning that the study was done with 2 percent milk, something that does make a difference. As noted in the study, it seems the fat to water content of the milk matters.

So, if the milk has a higher fat content, there is, obviously, more fat to get in the way of the water being absorbed. For the likes of almond milk, the cookie will absorb the liquid far quicker.

The study didn’t end there, though, as Splash Lab also uncovered the amount of time it takes for a cook to start to crumble. During that dunking, the boffins found that a single Oreo can stay together for up to five minutes in the milk. That means you can easily retrieve one that’s fallen to the bottom of a glass.

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