Second grade students ate edibles at school and chaos ensued

Cannabis / Culture
99

At Eisenhower Elementary School in Green Bay, Wisconsin parents are up in arms after second graders ate edibles on the playground.

Rob Hoffman
Jan 12, 2018

Parents’ worst fears came to life last month when two public school students ate marijuana that was brought to class by a second-grade boy.

The incident took place at Eisenhower Elementary School in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Parents of the children’s classmates were upset that they weren’t informed about the incident, though their children weren’t affected.

“Phone call, letter sent home, an email, something from the school and we haven’t heard anything still now, and I’m shocked,” said Carrie Falkner, mother of a 7-year-old student, according to WBAY. Falkner, like many other parents at the school, felt that regardless of whether their child ate any marijuana, they shouldn’t have been exposed to it in the first place. They were also upset that they were never notified of the incident by the school. 

Luckily, eating marijuana won’t get you high unless you eat a significant amount. It would likely take at least an eighth of high-quality bud for you to feel any of the effects. The students involved ended up at the hospital, but in the end, they were unharmed. Still, the incident illustrate’s the importance of responsible marijuana ownership and use.

“We see marijuana of course in the high schools and the middle schools but rarely do we see marijuana in the elementary schools,”  Lt. Jeff Brester, Green Bay Police told WBAY.

SecondGrader Marijuana Green Bay Second grade students ate edibles at school and chaos ensued
Photo courtesy of WBAY

The parents of the students are currently being investigated. But police can’t charge children under twelve years of age, and the child who brought the marijuana to school would likely have been seven or eight years old.

“We won’t be writing the students tickets because they’re not old enough to get tickets. But we will provide counseling for them through child protective services and through the school to do some education with them,” said Lt. Brester to WBAY.

The parents of other children at the school took to Facebook after the incident to air their grievances and outrage at the school. “Apparently the kid was handing it out and kids were eating it. It is very real….And, why weren’t parents informed?!” Wrote one parent on Facebook. “My kid came home saying kids brought weed to school! Is that what you’re talking about?” Wrote another parent.

For opponents of legalizing marijuana, this fear that children will have increased access to weed has been front and center. However, the evidence isn’t necessarily on their side. Teen marijuana use actually declined after Colorado legalized it, for example. State reports out of Colorado have also found that children are not smoking more marijuana since legalization, even though their parents are.

This schoolyard incident happened in Wisconsin, where recreational marijuana is still illegal, and even medical marijuana laws are strict.

Marijuana will not kill your child. But just like other common household drugs, like alcohol and prescription pills, parents need to practice responsible ownership—no matter which state you live in.

Rob Hoffman
Jan 12, 2018