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Legalization

Indiana’s Church of Cannabis sues the state over religious freedom. Touché!

If the law protects religious practices, how could it not also permit marijuana use — which remains illegal — as part of a broader spiritual philosophy?

Jul 10, 2015 - HERB

If this isn’t news worth sharing, we don’t know what is.

On July 1st a religious freedom law took effect in Indiana, prompting the Church of Cannabis to hold its first ever service, as well as test the (apparently) much-debated policy change.

Bill Levin, the white-haired church leader coined ‘the Grand Poobah’ (there is no explanation), outlines the logic:

“If the law protects religious practices, how could it not also permit marijuana use — which remains illegal here — as part of a broader spiritual philosophy?”

bill levin ENTERTAINING: Snoop Dogg Goes To Buy Weed On A Bicycle In Amsterdam
Photo credit: New York Times

We haven’t really thought of it that way, but it seems to be a valid point! After all, cannabis has been connected to spirituality for ages.

Some neighbors, on the other hand, were not pleased. Shari Logan, 46, counters:

“What’s next? The church of crack? The church of heroin? It’s a mockery to Christians, to God.”

protestors ENTERTAINING: Snoop Dogg Goes To Buy Weed On A Bicycle In Amsterdam
Photo credit: New York Times

Interesting rationale Ms. Logan, and intriguing suggestions. We’ll have to smoke a joint and think about it.

 

Featured image Huffington Post


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